New Solutions for Urban Agriculture Borrow A lot from Nature

Innovators have been on the search for a natural way of combating issues like climate change and water depletion. Most recently, a New York City-based team of international experts has come up with a product that copies how living organisms tap, keep, and dispense water. The product, which received $100,000 from the Ray C. Anderson Foundation Ray of Hope Prize, could be used to meet sustainable food production.
The product, dubbed AquaWeb, is intended to assist urban food producers with the collection, filtration, and distribution of the moisture in the atmosphere, all embedded into a single system. Instead of using underground water, AquaWeb collects fog and rainwater and uses several strategies to distribute it.

AquaWeb itself borrowed a lot from nature. For instance, to collect water from the air, it copies the cribellate orb weaver spider web. It also lends from drought-resistant plants abilities to store water, and also the Jersey cow mushroom’s ability to dispense water. In turn, urban farms, indoor vertical farms, and even greenhouses become more energy efficient and more resilient to common issues.

Significant Changes for Greenhouse Glass Panes

In other developments, researchers and scientists from the University of California in Santa Cruz have made groundbreaking changes to greenhouse glass panes. The new breakthrough makes the glasses more energy efficient, and less damaging to the surrounding.

The new greenhouses use solar energy, and the glass panes now come with a magenta dye. The shading makes it possible for different wavelengths to be controlled to their extreme potential. Such a breakthrough is vital to the future of greenhouse farming, and people like Josh Smith are following keenly.

About Josh Smith

Josh Smith is the founder and CEO of Modular Greenhouses. He went to the University of Nevada in Reno and runs most of his operations in Washoe County. Through his company, Josh Smith challenges people to use greenhouses to sort out matters affecting communities. Josh Smith believes that with the new glass panels, greenhouses might become more productive.

Josh Smith has more than 15 years of experience in startups and has stayed dedicated to advocating for greenhouse activities. He also hopes that through his company, Modular Greenhouses, he can take the technology to local farms, and even schools in Reno, and help them produce higher quality food.